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Nixle in Action: New Age of Tornado Warnings

Many states are enduring tornado season, and all of the destruction and disaster that goes a long with tornados. Tornados can cause so much devastation in such a short amount of time. David Conrad, EMA director, said that form the time a warning siren goes off, the tornado has already passes within 6 minutes of that[1]. When communities issue a “watch”, it means that conditions are favorable and citizens should be on the lookout. Once a “warning” has been issued, that means that a tornado has been spotted.

 

In Osceola County, Florida, the city will sound the sirens once the National Weather Service issues a tornado warning for their area[2]. For the NWS to issue a tornado warning, weather conditions must line up perfectly. Often, the last minute siren is not enough notice to fully prepare for a full speed tornado. Osceola relies on social media and Nixle to help inform residents of looming weather conditions and keep them safe.

 

Paulding County Sherriff’s Office is another community that uses Nixle as a resource in preparing for Tornados and severe weather. Although the NWS did not officially declare a warning, Paulding County was able to immediately share this information with residents and keep them on alert if conditions worsen.

 

Paulding County

A Nixle Alert from the Paulding County Sheriff’s Office

 

Many states are celebrating Severe Weather Awareness Week[3] which serves to help communities prepare for severe weather as well as find better ways to keep everyone informed during such emergencies. Tornado sirens often aren’t hear from indoors, especially if someone is using headphones are has other background noise such as the TV. By getting a message straight to your phone, Nixle can be used as the first step in alerting residents to potential storm activities to ensure that everyone has the time needed to find a safe shelter if needed. By signing up for Nixle alerts, residents are taking initiative to be safe and prepared during tornado season.

 

Severe Weather Response: Best Practices for Protecting Residents Using Community Engagement is a valuable tool to help your community prepare for severe weather using technology.

 

 

[1] http://www.circlevilleherald.com/news/director-emphasizes-preparedness-during-tornado-season/article_bd2873df-ef2b-592e-b5f7-17b70344e006.html

[2] http://www.osceolaiowa.com/2016/03/11/get-ready-for-spring-weather-storm-sirens/ae2deei/

[3] http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/severeweather/severewxcal.shtml